art-of-swords:

Late Anglo-Saxon Sword 
Dated: AD 875
Found: 1874 in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England
An iron sword fragment and hilt were found near Abingdon in Oxfordshire in 1874. The decoration on the sword hilt indicates this was a high status weapon dating from around AD 875. The style of the guards and pommel (Peterson style L) also suggest the sword dates from the late 9th to 10th century.
The sword hilt forms one of the most important examples of the late Anglo-Saxon silversmith’s art. The hilt is decorated with six silver engraved mounts; the engraved ornament on the mounts is in the Trewhiddle style - named after finds made at Trewhiddle, Cornwall. This style combines engraving and inlay with niello (black sulphide of silver).
The upper and lower guards are curved and contain various interlaced designs, including birds, animal and human figures, and foliate patterns. The figures on the upper guard have been identified as the four symbols of the evangelists.
The style of leaf used next to the figure of the eagle on the upper guard has also been identified on early tenth century embroideries from Durham, on the back of the Alfred Jewel and a number of other objects dating to this period.
The pommel incorporates two outward-looking animal heads, with protruding ears and round eyes and nostrils, now fragmentary. The lower portion of the iron blade is missing, however X-rays of the sword show that the blade is pattern welded.
The sword was acquired by Sir John Evans and presented to the Ashmolean in 1890. It is on display in the ‘England 400-1600’ gallery on the second floor.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Ashmolean Museum
art-of-swords:

Late Anglo-Saxon Sword 
Dated: AD 875
Found: 1874 in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England
An iron sword fragment and hilt were found near Abingdon in Oxfordshire in 1874. The decoration on the sword hilt indicates this was a high status weapon dating from around AD 875. The style of the guards and pommel (Peterson style L) also suggest the sword dates from the late 9th to 10th century.
The sword hilt forms one of the most important examples of the late Anglo-Saxon silversmith’s art. The hilt is decorated with six silver engraved mounts; the engraved ornament on the mounts is in the Trewhiddle style - named after finds made at Trewhiddle, Cornwall. This style combines engraving and inlay with niello (black sulphide of silver).
The upper and lower guards are curved and contain various interlaced designs, including birds, animal and human figures, and foliate patterns. The figures on the upper guard have been identified as the four symbols of the evangelists.
The style of leaf used next to the figure of the eagle on the upper guard has also been identified on early tenth century embroideries from Durham, on the back of the Alfred Jewel and a number of other objects dating to this period.
The pommel incorporates two outward-looking animal heads, with protruding ears and round eyes and nostrils, now fragmentary. The lower portion of the iron blade is missing, however X-rays of the sword show that the blade is pattern welded.
The sword was acquired by Sir John Evans and presented to the Ashmolean in 1890. It is on display in the ‘England 400-1600’ gallery on the second floor.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Ashmolean Museum
art-of-swords:

Late Anglo-Saxon Sword 
Dated: AD 875
Found: 1874 in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England
An iron sword fragment and hilt were found near Abingdon in Oxfordshire in 1874. The decoration on the sword hilt indicates this was a high status weapon dating from around AD 875. The style of the guards and pommel (Peterson style L) also suggest the sword dates from the late 9th to 10th century.
The sword hilt forms one of the most important examples of the late Anglo-Saxon silversmith’s art. The hilt is decorated with six silver engraved mounts; the engraved ornament on the mounts is in the Trewhiddle style - named after finds made at Trewhiddle, Cornwall. This style combines engraving and inlay with niello (black sulphide of silver).
The upper and lower guards are curved and contain various interlaced designs, including birds, animal and human figures, and foliate patterns. The figures on the upper guard have been identified as the four symbols of the evangelists.
The style of leaf used next to the figure of the eagle on the upper guard has also been identified on early tenth century embroideries from Durham, on the back of the Alfred Jewel and a number of other objects dating to this period.
The pommel incorporates two outward-looking animal heads, with protruding ears and round eyes and nostrils, now fragmentary. The lower portion of the iron blade is missing, however X-rays of the sword show that the blade is pattern welded.
The sword was acquired by Sir John Evans and presented to the Ashmolean in 1890. It is on display in the ‘England 400-1600’ gallery on the second floor.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Ashmolean Museum

art-of-swords:

Late Anglo-Saxon Sword 

  • Dated: AD 875
  • Found: 1874 in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England

An iron sword fragment and hilt were found near Abingdon in Oxfordshire in 1874. The decoration on the sword hilt indicates this was a high status weapon dating from around AD 875. The style of the guards and pommel (Peterson style L) also suggest the sword dates from the late 9th to 10th century.

The sword hilt forms one of the most important examples of the late Anglo-Saxon silversmith’s art. The hilt is decorated with six silver engraved mounts; the engraved ornament on the mounts is in the Trewhiddle style - named after finds made at Trewhiddle, Cornwall. This style combines engraving and inlay with niello (black sulphide of silver).

The upper and lower guards are curved and contain various interlaced designs, including birds, animal and human figures, and foliate patterns. The figures on the upper guard have been identified as the four symbols of the evangelists.

The style of leaf used next to the figure of the eagle on the upper guard has also been identified on early tenth century embroideries from Durham, on the back of the Alfred Jewel and a number of other objects dating to this period.

The pommel incorporates two outward-looking animal heads, with protruding ears and round eyes and nostrils, now fragmentary. The lower portion of the iron blade is missing, however X-rays of the sword show that the blade is pattern welded.

The sword was acquired by Sir John Evans and presented to the Ashmolean in 1890. It is on display in the ‘England 400-1600’ gallery on the second floor.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Ashmolean Museum

maritimehistorypodcast:

Horatio Nelson is Born

29 September 1758

Horatio Nelson was born on this day in history, 29 September 1758. He was a British flag officer famous for his service in the Royal Navy, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars. He was noted for his inspirational leadership and superb grasp of strategy and unconventional tactics, which resulted in a number of decisive naval victories. He was wounded several times in combat, losing one arm in the unsuccessful attempt to conquer Santa Cruz de Tenerife and the sight in one eye in Corsica. Of his several victories, the best known and most notable was the Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October 1805, during which he was shot and killed.

The Battle of Stamford Bridge
25 September 1066
King Harold Godwinson led the English forces against the invading Norwegian forces of King Harald Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, on this day in British history, 25 September 1066. Harold Godwinson emerged victorious from the bloody battle during which both Harald and Godwinson’s brother Tostig were killed. Despite his successful defeat of the Norwegian invaders, Harold’s victory was short-lived. Less than three weeks later he was defeated and killed by the invading Normans at the Battle of Hastings. The images above are (1) Battle of Stamford Bridge by Peter Nicolai Arbo (1870) and (2) a page from The Life of St. Edward the Confessor that depicts the Battle of Stamford Bridge. The Battle of Stamford Bridge
25 September 1066
King Harold Godwinson led the English forces against the invading Norwegian forces of King Harald Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, on this day in British history, 25 September 1066. Harold Godwinson emerged victorious from the bloody battle during which both Harald and Godwinson’s brother Tostig were killed. Despite his successful defeat of the Norwegian invaders, Harold’s victory was short-lived. Less than three weeks later he was defeated and killed by the invading Normans at the Battle of Hastings. The images above are (1) Battle of Stamford Bridge by Peter Nicolai Arbo (1870) and (2) a page from The Life of St. Edward the Confessor that depicts the Battle of Stamford Bridge.

The Battle of Stamford Bridge

25 September 1066

King Harold Godwinson led the English forces against the invading Norwegian forces of King Harald Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, on this day in British history, 25 September 1066. Harold Godwinson emerged victorious from the bloody battle during which both Harald and Godwinson’s brother Tostig were killed. Despite his successful defeat of the Norwegian invaders, Harold’s victory was short-lived. Less than three weeks later he was defeated and killed by the invading Normans at the Battle of Hastings. The images above are (1) Battle of Stamford Bridge by Peter Nicolai Arbo (1870) and (2) a page from The Life of St. Edward the Confessor that depicts the Battle of Stamford Bridge.

maritimehistorypodcast:

The Battle of Flamorough Head

23 September 1779

John Paul Jones led an American Continental Navy squadron against two British escort vessels at the Battle of Flamborough Head on this day in history, 23 September 1779. During the American Revolutionary War, American privateers frequently preyed on British commercial shipping routes rather than face the formidable Royal Navy. Many engagements took place in the North Atlantic, as France allowed the American privateers to put in at French ports whenever needed.

On 23 September 1779, Jones and his squadron encountered a British convoy off Flamborough Head. As the merchant ships retreated to the coast, two Royal Naval escorts remained to face the American squadron. Jones, in his French East Indiaman Bonhomme Richard, faced off with the British frigate Serapis in close-range engagement that raged through the night. After fighting for hours, British commander Richard Pearson supposedly asked Jones if he’d had enough. Jones reportedly replied, “I have not yet begun to fight!” 

By battle’s end, Bonhomme Richard had been battered nearly to splinters. Pearson aboard Serapis was forced to surrender after his ship caught fire and nearly ignited the powder magazine. With his vessel leaking badly and beyond repair at sea, Jones reluctantly abandoned ship and transferred his crew to the captured Serapis. He then sailed to the Dutch port of Texel, proudly displaying the American flag above the captured ensign of the Royal Navy.

maritimehistorypodcast:

The Battle of Arnemuiden

23 September 1338

The Battle of Arnemuiden, the first recorded European naval battle to use artillery, was fought between the English and French on this day in history, 23 September 1338. The battle took place near the beginning of the Hundred Years’ War. The English ship Christopher was recorded as having three cannons and one hand gun on board, making it the first European ship to use artillery in battle. The French, however, were victorious, taking control of the English transport ships and slaughtering the English sailors.

J. A. Buchon’s Collection des chroniques nationals françaises describes the battle this way: “Thus conquering did these said mariners of the king of France in this winter take great pillage, and especially they conquered the handsome great nef called the Christophe, all charged with the goods and wool that the English were sending to Flanders, which nef had cost the English king much to build: but its crew were lost to these Normans, and were put to death.”

maritimehistorypodcast:

Aboukir, Hogue, and Cressy are Sunk by U-9

22 September 1914

Three armored cruisers of the Royal Navy were sunk by a lone German U-boat on this day in history, 22 September 1914. The three Cressy-class cruisers, Aboukir, Hogue, and Cressy, were all built around 1900, and at the start of WWI many raised concerns that the ships were outdated and vulnerable to the more modern German U-boats.

On 22 September, the three cruisers were patrolling an area of the North Sea known as the Broad Fourteens. Many German U-boats passed through the Broad Fourteens en route to a U-boat base in L’Orient, France, and on the fateful September morning, U-9 surfaced and spotted the three British patrol ships. After firing a torpedo that quickly sunk Aboukir, U-9 went unspotted because the British assumed that Aboukir had hit a sea mine. As the remaining two ships moved in to rescue the sailors from Aboukir, U-9 was able to fire two torpedoes at Hogue, striking with both and sinking Hogue within minutes. Although Cressy spotted U-9 after the second salvo, she was unable to fire on U-9 and instead became the third victim of the morning.

The sinking of the three ships saw 1,459 sailors killed and ultimately left British public opinion shaken. By contrast, Kapitänleutnant Otto Weddigen, captain of U-9, returned to Germany a hero, as can be seen by the German propaganda postcard below depicting the sinking of two ships with an inset portrait of Captain Weddigen.

First Edition of The Hobbit is Published
21 September 1937
The first edition of The Hobbit was published on this day in British history, 21 September 1937. Published by George Allen & Unwin Ltd. of London, the first edition was printed in a run of 1,500 copies, all of which had sold by December 1937. This first printing was illustrated in black and white by Tolkien, who designed the dust jacket as well. First Edition of The Hobbit is Published
21 September 1937
The first edition of The Hobbit was published on this day in British history, 21 September 1937. Published by George Allen & Unwin Ltd. of London, the first edition was printed in a run of 1,500 copies, all of which had sold by December 1937. This first printing was illustrated in black and white by Tolkien, who designed the dust jacket as well.

First Edition of The Hobbit is Published

21 September 1937

The first edition of The Hobbit was published on this day in British history, 21 September 1937. Published by George Allen & Unwin Ltd. of London, the first edition was printed in a run of 1,500 copies, all of which had sold by December 1937. This first printing was illustrated in black and white by Tolkien, who designed the dust jacket as well.

H.G. Wells’ Birthday

21 September 1866

Today is the birthday of H.G. Wells, born this day in British history, 21 September 1866. Though he spent time writing in a variety of literary fields, he is best remembered for his work in the science fiction genre. His famous works of science fiction include The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, and The Island of Doctor Moreau.

british-history:

The Theatre Royal, Covent Garden, was opened on this day in British history, 18 September 1809. The first theatre had been destroyed by fire in December 1808 and the second theatre would suffer the same fate in 1856. The third iteration of the theatre is now known as the Royal Opera House and the original third construction still functions as the nucleus of the modern opera house.

british-history:

Today is the birthday of Dr. Samuel Johnson, an influential English writer and scholar, born on this day in British history, 18 September 1709. Johnson is most well remembered for his “Dictionary of the English Language,” published in 1755 after nine years of work. Until the completion of the Oxford English Dictionary 150 years later, Johnson’s was viewed as the pre-eminent British dictionary.

archaeologicalnews:

image

Richard III’s last moments were likely quick but terrifying, according to a new study of the death wounds of the last king of England to die in battle.

The last king of the Plantagenet dynasty faced his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field on Aug. 22, 1485, only two years after ascending the…

mapsontheweb:

Literary map of London

twogunsalute:

Characters from over 250 novels plotted in the parts of London they either called home or spent a lot of time. Designed by graphic artist Dex working with interior designer Anna Burles.

(via thepenultimaterolo)

The Battle of Brandywine Creek

11 September 1777

The British army defeated American troops at the Battle of Brandywine Creek, on this day in British history, 11 September 1777. The British troops under General Sir William Howe were able to break through the right flank of Major General George Washington’s formation. As the Americans retreated, Nathaniel Greene’s division held off the British long enough for Washington’s army to escape. The British victory at Brandywine was a major contributing factor to the downfall of Philadelphia only two weeks later.

maritimehistorypodcast:

The Battle of Lake Erie

10 September 1813

American victory at the Battle of Lake Erie led to the first unqualified defeat of a British naval squadron, on this day in history, 10 September 1813. American Captain Oliver Hazard Perry led a squadron of nine ships against six ships of the British Royal Navy under Robert Barclay.

Although the battle lasted only a few hours, it was hotly contested. Perry’s flagship Lawrence was demolished into uselessness because of the heavy fire it sustained. Three-fourths of its crew were killed, but Perry managed to transfer to Niagara and sail directly into the British line, firing broadsides and forcing the British to surrender. At the battle’s end the British had lost 41 killed and 94 wounded while the Americans had lost 27 killed and 96 wounded.

Despite having won the battle on the Niagara, Perry received the British surrender on the deck of the recaptured Lawrence, forcing the British to see the terrible price his men had paid. After the battle, Perry sent a famous dispatch to U.S. General William Henry Harrison that read, “We have met the enemy, and they are ours.”

The strategic importance of the Battle of Lake Erie was quite disproportionate to its actual size and number of participants. American victory allowed them to control Lake Erie for the remainder of the war, which in turn allowed them to recapture Detroit.

Hi British History community, thanks so much for sharing/spreading history and helping our Tumblr page to grow! It’s awesome to see :)

I want to ask your help in spreading the word about a project that’s just now getting off the ground, a podcast I’m producing called The Maritime History Podcast. It’s available on iTunes and on several other Android friendly platforms, and the website should point you to the relevant places. Thanks so much history lovers! And for what it’s worth, we’ll eventually hone in on the maritime and naval history of Britain, so it will have some relation to British history eventually ;)

Website - http://maritimehistorypodcast.com

Tumblr - http://maritimehistorypodcast.tumblr.com