art-of-swords:

Great Britain’s Sword of State
Maker: George Bowers, goldsmith, active 1660
Dated: 1678 - 1698
Medium: steel, silver gilt, the scabbard of wood, velvet, silver gilt.
Measurements: 121.3 x 32.1 cm
Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85), when King of Great Britain de facto (1660-85)
Provenance: supplied to Charles II in 1678, the scabbard supplied to William III
The sword has a broad, straight, flat, two-edged steel blade with etched decoration, and a cruciform silver-gilt hilt, the quillons in the form of a rampant lion and unicorn, a fleur-de-lis at the front of the quillon block and a Tudor rose at the back, with a portcullis above. The wooden scabbard is covered in velvet with applied silver-gilt emblems including a rose, thistle, harp and fleur-de-lis, with a portcullis, royal lions and the coat of arms of William III.
This sword, known as the Sword of State, was traditionally used by the monarch after the coronation, in place of the Sword of Offering (which was kept with the regalia in the Abbey), for all formal occasions, when it would have been carried before the sovereign. The hilt of the sword and the decorative emblems on the scabbard show that it was intended to be carried with the point upwards.
Two swords of state were made for Charles II - the first in 1660, and this one in 1678. It is described as 'a new Sword of Estate most extraordinarily wrought Enchased and gilt'. The 1660 sword was used when Charles II attended Parliament, and this example was used at other formal occasions such as the ceremonial creation of the Knights of the Bath.
The scabbard carries the coat of arms of William III and so dates from his coronation. The 1660 sword no longer exists but this one has remained among the regalia in the Tower of London. It is still used occasionally by the Queen for events such as the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the VE Day service in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1995.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Great Britain’s Sword of State
Maker: George Bowers, goldsmith, active 1660
Dated: 1678 - 1698
Medium: steel, silver gilt, the scabbard of wood, velvet, silver gilt.
Measurements: 121.3 x 32.1 cm
Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85), when King of Great Britain de facto (1660-85)
Provenance: supplied to Charles II in 1678, the scabbard supplied to William III
The sword has a broad, straight, flat, two-edged steel blade with etched decoration, and a cruciform silver-gilt hilt, the quillons in the form of a rampant lion and unicorn, a fleur-de-lis at the front of the quillon block and a Tudor rose at the back, with a portcullis above. The wooden scabbard is covered in velvet with applied silver-gilt emblems including a rose, thistle, harp and fleur-de-lis, with a portcullis, royal lions and the coat of arms of William III.
This sword, known as the Sword of State, was traditionally used by the monarch after the coronation, in place of the Sword of Offering (which was kept with the regalia in the Abbey), for all formal occasions, when it would have been carried before the sovereign. The hilt of the sword and the decorative emblems on the scabbard show that it was intended to be carried with the point upwards.
Two swords of state were made for Charles II - the first in 1660, and this one in 1678. It is described as 'a new Sword of Estate most extraordinarily wrought Enchased and gilt'. The 1660 sword was used when Charles II attended Parliament, and this example was used at other formal occasions such as the ceremonial creation of the Knights of the Bath.
The scabbard carries the coat of arms of William III and so dates from his coronation. The 1660 sword no longer exists but this one has remained among the regalia in the Tower of London. It is still used occasionally by the Queen for events such as the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the VE Day service in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1995.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Great Britain’s Sword of State
Maker: George Bowers, goldsmith, active 1660
Dated: 1678 - 1698
Medium: steel, silver gilt, the scabbard of wood, velvet, silver gilt.
Measurements: 121.3 x 32.1 cm
Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85), when King of Great Britain de facto (1660-85)
Provenance: supplied to Charles II in 1678, the scabbard supplied to William III
The sword has a broad, straight, flat, two-edged steel blade with etched decoration, and a cruciform silver-gilt hilt, the quillons in the form of a rampant lion and unicorn, a fleur-de-lis at the front of the quillon block and a Tudor rose at the back, with a portcullis above. The wooden scabbard is covered in velvet with applied silver-gilt emblems including a rose, thistle, harp and fleur-de-lis, with a portcullis, royal lions and the coat of arms of William III.
This sword, known as the Sword of State, was traditionally used by the monarch after the coronation, in place of the Sword of Offering (which was kept with the regalia in the Abbey), for all formal occasions, when it would have been carried before the sovereign. The hilt of the sword and the decorative emblems on the scabbard show that it was intended to be carried with the point upwards.
Two swords of state were made for Charles II - the first in 1660, and this one in 1678. It is described as 'a new Sword of Estate most extraordinarily wrought Enchased and gilt'. The 1660 sword was used when Charles II attended Parliament, and this example was used at other formal occasions such as the ceremonial creation of the Knights of the Bath.
The scabbard carries the coat of arms of William III and so dates from his coronation. The 1660 sword no longer exists but this one has remained among the regalia in the Tower of London. It is still used occasionally by the Queen for events such as the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the VE Day service in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1995.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Great Britain’s Sword of State
Maker: George Bowers, goldsmith, active 1660
Dated: 1678 - 1698
Medium: steel, silver gilt, the scabbard of wood, velvet, silver gilt.
Measurements: 121.3 x 32.1 cm
Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85), when King of Great Britain de facto (1660-85)
Provenance: supplied to Charles II in 1678, the scabbard supplied to William III
The sword has a broad, straight, flat, two-edged steel blade with etched decoration, and a cruciform silver-gilt hilt, the quillons in the form of a rampant lion and unicorn, a fleur-de-lis at the front of the quillon block and a Tudor rose at the back, with a portcullis above. The wooden scabbard is covered in velvet with applied silver-gilt emblems including a rose, thistle, harp and fleur-de-lis, with a portcullis, royal lions and the coat of arms of William III.
This sword, known as the Sword of State, was traditionally used by the monarch after the coronation, in place of the Sword of Offering (which was kept with the regalia in the Abbey), for all formal occasions, when it would have been carried before the sovereign. The hilt of the sword and the decorative emblems on the scabbard show that it was intended to be carried with the point upwards.
Two swords of state were made for Charles II - the first in 1660, and this one in 1678. It is described as 'a new Sword of Estate most extraordinarily wrought Enchased and gilt'. The 1660 sword was used when Charles II attended Parliament, and this example was used at other formal occasions such as the ceremonial creation of the Knights of the Bath.
The scabbard carries the coat of arms of William III and so dates from his coronation. The 1660 sword no longer exists but this one has remained among the regalia in the Tower of London. It is still used occasionally by the Queen for events such as the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the VE Day service in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1995.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Great Britain’s Sword of State

  • Maker: George Bowers, goldsmith, active 1660
  • Dated: 1678 - 1698
  • Medium: steel, silver gilt, the scabbard of wood, velvet, silver gilt.
  • Measurements: 121.3 x 32.1 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85), when King of Great Britain de facto (1660-85)
  • Provenance: supplied to Charles II in 1678, the scabbard supplied to William III

The sword has a broad, straight, flat, two-edged steel blade with etched decoration, and a cruciform silver-gilt hilt, the quillons in the form of a rampant lion and unicorn, a fleur-de-lis at the front of the quillon block and a Tudor rose at the back, with a portcullis above. The wooden scabbard is covered in velvet with applied silver-gilt emblems including a rose, thistle, harp and fleur-de-lis, with a portcullis, royal lions and the coat of arms of William III.

This sword, known as the Sword of State, was traditionally used by the monarch after the coronation, in place of the Sword of Offering (which was kept with the regalia in the Abbey), for all formal occasions, when it would have been carried before the sovereign. The hilt of the sword and the decorative emblems on the scabbard show that it was intended to be carried with the point upwards.

Two swords of state were made for Charles II - the first in 1660, and this one in 1678. It is described as 'a new Sword of Estate most extraordinarily wrought Enchased and gilt'. The 1660 sword was used when Charles II attended Parliament, and this example was used at other formal occasions such as the ceremonial creation of the Knights of the Bath.

The scabbard carries the coat of arms of William III and so dates from his coronation. The 1660 sword no longer exists but this one has remained among the regalia in the Tower of London. It is still used occasionally by the Queen for events such as the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the VE Day service in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1995.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

William Wilberforce Dies at Age 73

29 July 1833

It was on this day in British history, 29 July 1833, that William Wilberforce died at the age of 73. Wilberforce was instrumental in bringing about the abolition of slavery in Britain. After dedicating his life to the abolitionist cause, Wilberforce died only a month before Parliament passed the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.

Beatrix Potter’s Birthday

28 July 1866

Today is the birthday of Beatrix Potter, born on this day in British history, 28 July 1866. She is most remembered for her work as an author and illustrator of children’s books. Her most famous creation, Peter Rabbit, is still a popular and well loved character today.

Thomas Cromwell is Executed

28 July 1540

It was on this day in British history, 28 July 1540, that Thomas Cromwell was executed on Tower Hill. Cromwell had become an enemy of King Henry VIII in the midst of the political turmoil that accompanied Henry’s tumultuous reign. Henry VIII went ahead and married Catherine Howard on the very same day that Cromwell was beheaded.

maritimehistorypodcast:

The Battle of Ushant (1st)

27 July 1778

The fleets of France and Britain met at the Battle of Ushant (1st) on this day in maritime history, 27 July 1778. The battle was part of the American Revolution and was fought 100 miles west of Ushant, a French island at the mouth of the English Channel. The British fleet was made up of 29 ships-of-the-line, and was led by Admiral Augustus Keppel in HMS Victory, while the French fleet was 32 ships strong and led by Vice-Admiral the Comte d’Orvilliers. The French Vice-Admiral had orders to avoid battle, but shifting winds and heavy rain essentially forced the two fleets into battle. However, after brief exchanges of fire from both sides, the French fleet withdrew and the British declined to give chase. The inconclusive outcome led to political disputes within each country. In France, Louis Philippe II, Duke of Orleans, resigned from the Navy after being accused of blundering during the battle. In Britain, Admiral Keppel and his Vice-Admiral had a falling out, each calling for the other to be court-martialed, charges that were eventually dismissed despite Keppel’s resignation from the Navy.

The Battle of Bouvines

27 July 1214

The Battle of Bouvines, an important though often overlooked medieval battle, took place on this day in British history, 27 July 1214. The battle ended ended the Anglo-French War (1202–1214), and fundamentally contributed to the early development of medieval France by confirming the French crown’s sovereignty over the Angevin lands of Brittany and Normandy.

Philip Augustus of France defeated an army consisting of Imperial German, English and Flemish soldiers, led by Otto IV of Germany. Other leaders included Count Ferrand of Flanders, William de Longespee and Renaud of Boulogne. The defeat was so decisive that Otto was deposed and replaced by Frederick II Hohenstaufen; Ferrand and Renaud were captured and imprisoned and King John of England was forced to sign the Magna Carta by his discontented barons. Philip was himself able to take undisputed control of most of the territories in France that had belonged to King John of England, Otto’s maternal uncle and ally.

The Bank of England Act

27 July 1694

The Bank of England Act was passed by Parliament on this day in British history, 27 July 1694. It officially founded the Bank of England, at the time only the second central bank in the world. The bank was primarily created to help finance a rebuilding of England’s navy in the face of defeat to France at the Battle of Beachy Head (1690), France’s greatest naval victory during the Nine Years’ War.

First Battle of El Alamein

27 July 1942

The First Battle of El Alamein concluded in a tactical stalemate on this day in British history, 27 July 1942. German Field Marshall Erwin Rommel led the Afrika Korps in a bid to gain power in Egypt and northern Africa. The Allied forces, mainly led by British General Claude Auchinleck, were able to repel the Nazis after a second battle.

maritimehistorypodcast:

Sea Venture Wrecks on the Bermuda Reefs
25 July 1609
The English ship ‘Sea Venture’ wrecked on the reefs of Bermuda on this day in maritime history, 25 July 1609. Sea Venture had departed from Plymouth, England, as the flagship of a 7-ship Virginia Company fleet destined for Jamestown, Virginia. On the voyage, the fleet was caught in a hurricane and the ships separated. Although it fought the storm for several days, Sea Venture’s timbers had not yet set and the ship began to leak rapidly as the caulking was forced out from between the timbers. 
Having spied land on the morning of 25 July, the captain made for the reefs of what proved to be Bermuda and ran the ship aground in the hopes that the passengers and crew (and one dog) could be saved. All 150 people aboard Sea Venture were saved (including the dog), though they were stranded on Bermuda for nine months, during which time they built two new ships from Bermuda cedar and parts salvaged from Sea Venture, especially her rigging. The survivors left Bermuda in various groups, each suffering a different fate. Three survivors remained on Bermuda and a permanent colony was established in 1612.
The coat of arms of Bermuda depicts a red lion holding a shield that has a depiction of a wrecked ship upon it. The red lion is a symbol of England and alludes to Bermuda’s relationship with that country. The wrecked ship is the Sea Venture, the flagship of the Virginia Company. The Latin motto under the coat of arms, Quo Fata Ferunt, means “Whither the Fates Carry [Us]”. maritimehistorypodcast:

Sea Venture Wrecks on the Bermuda Reefs
25 July 1609
The English ship ‘Sea Venture’ wrecked on the reefs of Bermuda on this day in maritime history, 25 July 1609. Sea Venture had departed from Plymouth, England, as the flagship of a 7-ship Virginia Company fleet destined for Jamestown, Virginia. On the voyage, the fleet was caught in a hurricane and the ships separated. Although it fought the storm for several days, Sea Venture’s timbers had not yet set and the ship began to leak rapidly as the caulking was forced out from between the timbers. 
Having spied land on the morning of 25 July, the captain made for the reefs of what proved to be Bermuda and ran the ship aground in the hopes that the passengers and crew (and one dog) could be saved. All 150 people aboard Sea Venture were saved (including the dog), though they were stranded on Bermuda for nine months, during which time they built two new ships from Bermuda cedar and parts salvaged from Sea Venture, especially her rigging. The survivors left Bermuda in various groups, each suffering a different fate. Three survivors remained on Bermuda and a permanent colony was established in 1612.
The coat of arms of Bermuda depicts a red lion holding a shield that has a depiction of a wrecked ship upon it. The red lion is a symbol of England and alludes to Bermuda’s relationship with that country. The wrecked ship is the Sea Venture, the flagship of the Virginia Company. The Latin motto under the coat of arms, Quo Fata Ferunt, means “Whither the Fates Carry [Us]”.

maritimehistorypodcast:

Sea Venture Wrecks on the Bermuda Reefs

25 July 1609

The English ship ‘Sea Venture’ wrecked on the reefs of Bermuda on this day in maritime history, 25 July 1609. Sea Venture had departed from Plymouth, England, as the flagship of a 7-ship Virginia Company fleet destined for Jamestown, Virginia. On the voyage, the fleet was caught in a hurricane and the ships separated. Although it fought the storm for several days, Sea Venture’s timbers had not yet set and the ship began to leak rapidly as the caulking was forced out from between the timbers. 

Having spied land on the morning of 25 July, the captain made for the reefs of what proved to be Bermuda and ran the ship aground in the hopes that the passengers and crew (and one dog) could be saved. All 150 people aboard Sea Venture were saved (including the dog), though they were stranded on Bermuda for nine months, during which time they built two new ships from Bermuda cedar and parts salvaged from Sea Venture, especially her rigging. The survivors left Bermuda in various groups, each suffering a different fate. Three survivors remained on Bermuda and a permanent colony was established in 1612.

The coat of arms of Bermuda depicts a red lion holding a shield that has a depiction of a wrecked ship upon it. The red lion is a symbol of England and alludes to Bermuda’s relationship with that country. The wrecked ship is the Sea Venture, the flagship of the Virginia Company. The Latin motto under the coat of arms, Quo Fata Ferunt, means “Whither the Fates Carry [Us]”.

The Coronation of James I

25 July 1603

James VI of Scotland was crowned King of England and Ireland on this day in British history, 25 July 1603, becoming James I. Although the kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciary, and laws, James brought about the Union of the Crowns, a union of the states (including Ireland) under the same monarch. James would continue to sit on all three thrones until his death in 1625. England and Scotland were not brought under unified parliamentary rule until the Acts of Union of 1707, with Ireland remaining a separate kingdom that was subordinate to England until 1784.

maritimehistorypodcast:

Sir Horatio Nelson Wounded at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife

24 July 1797

Upon hearing reports that Spanish treasure conveys frequently stopped at the port city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife in the Canary Islands, in July 1797, Admiral John Jervis dispatched a small squadron under recently promoted Rear Admiral Horatio Nelson with the aim of seizing Santa Cruz by means of an amphibious attack. When the expedition arrived in the vicinity of Santa Cruz on 17 July, it numbered 400 guns and nearly 4,000 men.

After the initial landing plans failed on 23 July, Nelson Nelson called his captains on board Theseus and explained how he himself would lead the next move ahead of a boat group followed by five more boats. On the night of 24 July 1797, Nelson led what they hoped would be a surprise amphibious landing. However, the Spanish lookout sounded the alarm when the British troops drew close to land, and the disembarking soldiers were met by a heavy barrage of cannon fire. British forces led by Captain Bowen rushed the battery covering the harbour, captured it and spiked its guns. They began to pursue the fleeing Spanish into the town, but were swept by a hail of grapeshot. Bowen, his first lieutenant and several of his men were killed, while Nelson, who was just landing from his boat, was hit in the right arm.

Nelson was bleeding copiously and his stepson, Lieutenant Nisbet, cut a piece of his own neck handkerchief and tied it tightly around Nelson’s arm to stop the bleeding. The admiral refused to use the frigate Seahorse that was stationed close by, to be taken back to his flagship, as it would imply that Captain Fremantle would have to hoist a flag of distress and thereby demoralise the crews. Instead, the sailors of his boat rowed hard back to the Theseus. The surgeon had been warned of the contingency and got his instruments ready. Nelson was cited as saying, as he pointed to his right arm “Doctor, I want to get rid of this useless piece of flesh here”. Nelson’s operation was quick and aseptic. The limb was thrown over board, despite the admiral’s wish to keep it.

In the end, having sustained heavy losses, Nelson was forced to withdraw from Tenerife and sail back to England with a demoralised force. 

The Battle of Harlaw

24 July 1411

The Battle of Harlaw was a medieval Scottish battle that took place on this day in history, 24 July 1411. It is traditionally viewed as one of the bloodiest battles in Scottish history and was part of an ongoing feud between clans. A 40 foot tower/monument stands as a memorial at the battlefield near Inverurie.

art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] 11th century Viking broadsword to make up to $205,000 at Christie’s

A Viking broadsword looted during the battle of Stamford Bridge in 1066 is to auction at Christie’s London this summer with an estimate of £80,000-120,000 ($136,873-205,309).

The lot is thought to have been taken by a member of the de Bohun family, who would later carry the ancestral sword during the first war of Scottish independence in the 14th century.

Dernagh O’Leary, a spokesperson for Christie’s, told the BBC: "Whilst it cannot be proved, it is not at all inconceivable that the blade of the present sword was captured or taken as a trophy by de Bohun at Hastings and was later remounted to become a family sword.

"The present sword, whilst not being a war sword, would have served as a clear badge of identity with its gold and enamelled coat of arms on the pommel and eminently more practical as a side arm around camp when not mounted and armed for battle.

"It is therefore entirely possible that this sword was present at Bannockburn in June 1314, if not actually on the field of battle."

The lot is incredibly rare, its age and history making it one of the most significant British artefacts to come to auction in recent years.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Paul Fraser Collectibles

maritimehistorypodcast:

HMS Newfoundland is Torpedoed, and Ascianghi Sinks
23 July 1943
On 23 July 1943, HMS Newfoundland, a Royal Navy Crown Colony-class light cruiser, was torpedoed and severely damaged while in a formation off the eastern coast of Sicily. Although many now think that U-407 was responsible, Italian submarine Ascianghi was also in the area. The Allied formation responded by dropping depth charges that caused damage to Ascianghi, forcing the submarine to surface. As soon as the submarine broke the surface, HMS Eclipse and HMS Laforey, both Royal Navy destroyers, concentrated heavy shelling on Ascianghi. Having sustained heavy damage, Ascianghi sank within minutes, along with 23 of the 50 crew members. British ships rescued the other 27 crewmen, and HMS Newfoundland was carried to Malta to receive temporary repairs. maritimehistorypodcast:

HMS Newfoundland is Torpedoed, and Ascianghi Sinks
23 July 1943
On 23 July 1943, HMS Newfoundland, a Royal Navy Crown Colony-class light cruiser, was torpedoed and severely damaged while in a formation off the eastern coast of Sicily. Although many now think that U-407 was responsible, Italian submarine Ascianghi was also in the area. The Allied formation responded by dropping depth charges that caused damage to Ascianghi, forcing the submarine to surface. As soon as the submarine broke the surface, HMS Eclipse and HMS Laforey, both Royal Navy destroyers, concentrated heavy shelling on Ascianghi. Having sustained heavy damage, Ascianghi sank within minutes, along with 23 of the 50 crew members. British ships rescued the other 27 crewmen, and HMS Newfoundland was carried to Malta to receive temporary repairs.

maritimehistorypodcast:

HMS Newfoundland is Torpedoed, and Ascianghi Sinks

23 July 1943

On 23 July 1943, HMS Newfoundland, a Royal Navy Crown Colony-class light cruiser, was torpedoed and severely damaged while in a formation off the eastern coast of Sicily. Although many now think that U-407 was responsible, Italian submarine Ascianghi was also in the area. The Allied formation responded by dropping depth charges that caused damage to Ascianghi, forcing the submarine to surface. As soon as the submarine broke the surface, HMS Eclipse and HMS Laforey, both Royal Navy destroyers, concentrated heavy shelling on Ascianghi. Having sustained heavy damage, Ascianghi sank within minutes, along with 23 of the 50 crew members. British ships rescued the other 27 crewmen, and HMS Newfoundland was carried to Malta to receive temporary repairs.

yeaverily:

Royal finger rings from anglo-saxon England belonging to King Ethelwulf and his daughter Queen Ethelswith 828-858 A.D.

(via arthistorycq)