The Coronation of William & Mary

11 April 1689

William III and Mary II were crowned joint rulers of Britain, on this day in British history, 11 April 1689. At the request of Parliament, William of Orange had come to England in November 1688, with a 20,000 strong Dutch army behind him. After marching to London and forcing James II to flee, William and Mary had completed the ‘Glorious Revolution.’ The Archbishop of Canterbury, however, still recognized James as king, so the coronation ceremony was officiated by the Bishop of London.

The Coronation of Henry V

9 April 1413

King Henry V of England was crowned in a ceremony at Westminster, on this day in British history, 9 April 1413. The coronation was officiated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Arundel. The only main details recorded by contemporary chroniclers focus on the bad weather–a snowstorm–and on the food served at the banquet. Because the coronation had taken place on Passion Sunday, and the English monarchs were still Catholic, the only meat served at the banquet was fish.

Sir Francis Drake is Knighted

4 April 1581

It was on this day in British history, 4 April 1581, that Queen Elizabeth awarded a knighthood to Sir Francis Drake. Drake had become the first Englishmen to circumnavigate the globe when he sailed into Plymouth aboard his ship, the Golden Hind, in September 1580. The knighting ceremony took place aboard Drake’s ship, but almost all popular depictions of the Queen dubbing Drake are incorrect. In reality, Elizabeth allowed a French nobleman named Monsieur de Marchaumont to dub Drake, a move that was purely political. After being knighted, Drake became the Mayor of Plymouth and later continued his distinguished naval career.

The Royal Air Force is Formed

1 April 1918

The Royal Air Force was founded on this day in British history, 1 April 1918. It is the world’s oldest independent air force. The RAF was formed by combining the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service and was controlled by the British Government Air Ministry which had been established three months earlier. The decision to merge the two services and create an independent air force was a response to the events of World War I, the first war in which air power made a significant impact.

(The image above is an RAF recruitment poster from 1918)

archaeologicalnews:

Tony Carter, a resident of Uttlesford, found the 1,400-year-old jewel - dubbed The North-Essex Ring - in 2011, describing it as the highlight of his 41 years in metal detecting.

It is highly decorated with Anglo-Saxon motifs. Birds, an interlaced ornament, an engraving of a belted human…

The Treaty of Paris of 1856 brought a conclusion to the Crimean War on this day in British history, 30 March 1856. The formal signing took place at the Congress of Paris and involved representatives of Russia on the one side, and the alliance of Britain, France, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia on the other. Austria and Prussia were also represented at the Congress, although they had technically remained neutral during the conflict.

http://todayinbritishhistory.com/crimean-war-concludes-30-march-1856/

Forensic tests have revealed that the skeletons unearthed in the London Crossrail excavations are 14th century victims of the Black Death.

 

Royal Albert Hall was officially opened on this day in British history, 29 March 1871. Construction had taken four years, and the hall was named after Queen Victoria’s late husband, Prince Albert. Albert had a great affinity for the arts and had begun the process of creating permanent artistic venues before his untimely death in 1861. Still in a deep mourning ten years later, Queen Victoria was overcome with emotion at the opening ceremony and unable to speak. Edward, the Prince of Wales, gave a speech in her place, and the Royal Albert Hall held its first concert on 29 March 1871.
http://todayinbritishhistory.com/royal-albert-halls-opening-ceremony-29-march-1871/ Royal Albert Hall was officially opened on this day in British history, 29 March 1871. Construction had taken four years, and the hall was named after Queen Victoria’s late husband, Prince Albert. Albert had a great affinity for the arts and had begun the process of creating permanent artistic venues before his untimely death in 1861. Still in a deep mourning ten years later, Queen Victoria was overcome with emotion at the opening ceremony and unable to speak. Edward, the Prince of Wales, gave a speech in her place, and the Royal Albert Hall held its first concert on 29 March 1871.
http://todayinbritishhistory.com/royal-albert-halls-opening-ceremony-29-march-1871/ Royal Albert Hall was officially opened on this day in British history, 29 March 1871. Construction had taken four years, and the hall was named after Queen Victoria’s late husband, Prince Albert. Albert had a great affinity for the arts and had begun the process of creating permanent artistic venues before his untimely death in 1861. Still in a deep mourning ten years later, Queen Victoria was overcome with emotion at the opening ceremony and unable to speak. Edward, the Prince of Wales, gave a speech in her place, and the Royal Albert Hall held its first concert on 29 March 1871.
http://todayinbritishhistory.com/royal-albert-halls-opening-ceremony-29-march-1871/

Royal Albert Hall was officially opened on this day in British history, 29 March 1871. Construction had taken four years, and the hall was named after Queen Victoria’s late husband, Prince Albert. Albert had a great affinity for the arts and had begun the process of creating permanent artistic venues before his untimely death in 1861. Still in a deep mourning ten years later, Queen Victoria was overcome with emotion at the opening ceremony and unable to speak. Edward, the Prince of Wales, gave a speech in her place, and the Royal Albert Hall held its first concert on 29 March 1871.

http://todayinbritishhistory.com/royal-albert-halls-opening-ceremony-29-march-1871/

archaeologicalnews:

Archaeologists working at Whitby Abbey, the Benedictine ruins in North Yorkshire which have produced carved stones and the remains of an Anglian cemetery during 20 years of excavations, are preparing to reveal their latest findings from the site as they approach the end of a second week of…

“The lights of Saxon England were going out, and in the gathering darkness a gentle, grey-beard prophet foretold the end. When on his death-bed Edward spoke on a time of evil that was coming upon the land his inspired mutterings struck terror into the hearers.”
— Winston Churchill describing the death of Edward the Confessor, which happened only months before William the Conqueror invaded England. [*]

Take a look at some amazing pictures of a replica ‘Neolithic’ long barrow being constructed….

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword
Dated: circa 1800
Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
Culture: English
The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.
It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.
Sidenotes:
Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

art-of-swords:

Infantry Officer 1822 Pattern Sword

  • Dated: circa 1800
  • Maker: Silver & Co, 67 Cornhill, London
  • Culture: English

The 1822 Pattern Infantry Officer’s Sword has a “Gothic” style pierced hilt, so-called after its resemblance to the shapes of windows in Gothic architecture and the “s-shaped” folding guard. There is a Royal cipher for Victoria Regina (reigning from 1838 to 1901) placed within an oval hilt cartouche.

It has a brass scabbard with two suspension rings. The grip is covered in grey rayfish skin. The brass hilt has a folding guard for a better grip and comfort of the hand. The sword heatures a slightly curved and double-edged blade engraved on the full length with military and folia attributes.

Sidenotes:

  1. Apparently, as a fighting weapon, the 1822 Pattern was rather unsatisfactory, the blade being far too weak and the hilt bars affording little protection.
  2. When the 1845 Pattern blade was introduced, officers were not required to immediately change to the new pattern. They were allowed to carry the old pipe back sword blade until it became obsolete.

Source: Copyright © 2013 Swords Collection

(via somehistoriancalledmike)

todayinhistory:

March 27th 1625: Charles I becomes King
On this day in 1625, Charles I became King of England, Scotland and Ireland. He succeeded to the throne upon the death of his father King James I. Charles and his father believed in the divine right of kings to absolute rule. This caused Charles’s struggle for power with Parliament and resentment among his subjects for his seemingly tyrannical actions like taxing without the consent of Parliament and interfering with churches. The English Civil War broke out in the last years of his reign, which pitted the crown against Parliament. Charles was captured by the Parliamentarians and executed for high treason in 1649. The monarchy was then abolished but returned in 1660 with Charles’s son in power.
todayinhistory:

March 27th 1625: Charles I becomes King
On this day in 1625, Charles I became King of England, Scotland and Ireland. He succeeded to the throne upon the death of his father King James I. Charles and his father believed in the divine right of kings to absolute rule. This caused Charles’s struggle for power with Parliament and resentment among his subjects for his seemingly tyrannical actions like taxing without the consent of Parliament and interfering with churches. The English Civil War broke out in the last years of his reign, which pitted the crown against Parliament. Charles was captured by the Parliamentarians and executed for high treason in 1649. The monarchy was then abolished but returned in 1660 with Charles’s son in power.
todayinhistory:

March 27th 1625: Charles I becomes King
On this day in 1625, Charles I became King of England, Scotland and Ireland. He succeeded to the throne upon the death of his father King James I. Charles and his father believed in the divine right of kings to absolute rule. This caused Charles’s struggle for power with Parliament and resentment among his subjects for his seemingly tyrannical actions like taxing without the consent of Parliament and interfering with churches. The English Civil War broke out in the last years of his reign, which pitted the crown against Parliament. Charles was captured by the Parliamentarians and executed for high treason in 1649. The monarchy was then abolished but returned in 1660 with Charles’s son in power.

todayinhistory:

March 27th 1625: Charles I becomes King

On this day in 1625, Charles I became King of England, Scotland and Ireland. He succeeded to the throne upon the death of his father King James I. Charles and his father believed in the divine right of kings to absolute rule. This caused Charles’s struggle for power with Parliament and resentment among his subjects for his seemingly tyrannical actions like taxing without the consent of Parliament and interfering with churches. The English Civil War broke out in the last years of his reign, which pitted the crown against Parliament. Charles was captured by the Parliamentarians and executed for high treason in 1649. The monarchy was then abolished but returned in 1660 with Charles’s son in power.

ancientart:

Sword from the Anglo-Saxon Sutton Hoo ship-burial, dates to approximately AD 620. Suffolk, England.

This sword is one of the many artifacts discovered in the Sutton Hoo ship-burial, which is thought to have belonged to one of four East Anglian kings: Eorpwald, Raedwald and co-regents Ecric, and Sigebert. The artifacts of this burial were chosen to reflect the high rank of the king, and to equip him for the Afterlife.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Völkerwanderer.

(via art-of-swords)